Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Give Her an Inch...

It's true. The new found freedom of eating things I was not "supposed" to eat before, without guilt, has resulted in my inner fatgirl raging for donuts. Give the girl a banana, she wants a cake. Tell her she no longer is limited to three measured condiments a day, and she will slather her turkey burger in mayonnaise and ketchup. Let her eat acorn squash, she thinks potato chips must be okay (hey! I am "allowed" to eat white potatoes, salt, and oil, right?? Right??) All this justification and rationalization pops up. Hey, a hot dog is meat, right? Can a bun be a condiment?

I know it sounds silly. Just because I loosened the reigns a little is no reason to plunge off the deep end. Yet that is just how my mind is trying to get what it wants. Instead of remembering some very basic rules (measure and weigh the food, limit even healthy fats, and don't eat grains in ANY form), I have intrusive thoughts of eating stuff that I have no business eating. I know if I eat one cookie, it triggers something insane. I want more cookies, and a bunch of other processed junk. So it really is best for me not to have one cookie.

Before, thoughts of kicking myself out of ketosis were enough to keep me away from anything carb-laden, or even a few extra condiments. Now, that is not an issue. I have not been counting *anything* except portions and servings. Not calories, not carbs, not fat grams. And I don't *need* to, technically. The program takes care of itself. If I eat what Transition prescribes, I land in the range of 1200ish calories right now... more like 1300 with the optional snack I always take. But since I am tossing in a little butter here and light mayo there, I am closer to 1400 every day. With only mild exercise so far, this ought to be enough to keep my weight from going up, even if it doesn't go down right away as my body gets used to the changes. But the scale bumped up a bit today. Salt? Bloat? I dunno. I have to fight myself not to freak out and "do something" about it. I am determined to ride this out, all six weeks, adding in food groups and upping exercise slowly. I am doing this for my health, which is not only about the scale. So I accept that the scale might be a little scary until things stabilize and I get into a food and exercise routine.

I am thinking about adding in the dairy earlier than Monday. Since I already eat from the "meatless options" list which includes low fat cheese and Greek yogurt, the only actual dairy I will be adding in is a cup of low fat milk and/or regular yogurt. I have been super hungry the last two days, and I hope that when I do add dairy back it will give me sufficient protein to quell my hunger. That way I can have that Greek yogurt and berries for breakfast and still have a full 6-ounce serving of chicken breast with dinner.

I am trying to sort through all the info on Paleo, Primal, Dukan, etc that you kindly left me in the comments of the last post. It is all very interesting. I want to figure out if ALL grains are inflammatory/unhealthy or if it is primarily wheat. Are oats bad too? Because I do miss having oatmeal for breakfast. How about rice? Quinoa? And the whole legume thing... I need to do more reading on that. I had hoped to eventually be eating *less* meat and more beans. But I have to do some research on which would be better for my health. I do want to avoid foods that cause inflammation, as my arthritis can be very painful if I eat the wrong things, especially sugar and white flour.

I have a lot of *stuff* going on in my personal life right now, including two kids with sinus infections and a house that has decided to need a gazillion repairs at once. I also have a life-threatening allergy to certain stinging insects that have suddenly started appearing not only *around* my home but IN it. So I am off to take care of things, included arranging a series of allergy shots that could end up saving my life if I get stung. I have a Superfoods Challenge post half written but I think it's just going to have to wait til next Monday. Keep on keeping on with the Superfoods we already covered, though! Try something new this week!

18 comments:

Taryl said...

I referenced this yesterday, but this a paleo-ish diet that allows some starches that aren't inflammatory:

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?page_id=8

You can do things like white rice, sweet potato, etc. it is the whole grains and legumes, with their anti nutrients, that cause major issues in our bodies. Oats would be in that category, unfortunately. You may find you tolerate them well and can add them in, but I just generally avoid grains these days and haven't had those wicked cravings OR immune issues. The blog that goes with that diet is on the same site and a wealth of information it you're looking to go paleo-ish with it being maintainable long term.

My brain goes on those food desire jags too, but that is where God gives us strength we don't otherwise possess. We can master our herts in this matter and exercise self control, we don't have to be slaves to whims that we know aren't good for us but feel right at the time. I'm really praying you continue to have victory in this area!

Lyn said...

Thank you Taryl, I am checking that out too.

I wish the scientific community could just come to a consensus on what is best for us to eat! Everyone has different ideas. I am trying to just take it slow and see where I end up. I think keeping wheat out of my diet (and processed stuff/sugar) is a good base, and then I have to decide what to add in to the meat, veggies, and healthy fats.

Lyn said...

(and thank you for your prayers!)

Jac said...

Maybe don't worry so much about *researching* which grains are inflammatory (because everybody has a different opinion and different "science" to back their view), but try an elimination diet like Whole30 and just see what works *for you*. Even if Paleo says "no rice", if you feel good eating a little rice, then keep it in your diet in moderation. Just my two cents!
~Jaclyn

Anonymous said...

I am not able to eat anything with sugar or flour either without my arthritis flaring up and major inflamation. I was at Walmart yesterday and walked past the strawberries and thought of you wondering if "Lyn" was enjoying her fruit! One day I will reach goal and can have fruit again!
Hugs,
Noxie

Anonymous said...

In terms of the latest scientific research on what truly works for fat loss, I would recommend reading "The Smarter Science of Slim" by Jonathan Bailor. He spent a decade reviewing research on weight loss and this book is the result. I have not started following his recommendations due to emotional issues, but it has radically influenced my opinions on what is truly healthy and what promotes long-lasting weight loss. I really believe this is the latest and best scientific evidence out there on what works. It is available on Amazon.

Lori

Kathleen said...

Lyn, I am glad you realize that the loosening of the rules is affecting you. I hope you can keep hold of yourself long enough to ride it out. You don't need Paleo, low-carb, gluten-free etc. in order to be thin and healthy. However, these diets do work for a lot of people in part because having clear 'rules' often help keep a person in check. This stage (transition) is the worst. If you get through it, it will only get better. Don't give in! I know it is SO HARD. But you won't ever regret sticking to your guns.

Claire said...

After coming off a low carb diet once you raise your carbs everyone gets that hunger. It's your appetite returning and your body wanting the carbs it's been missing. It does die down. It doesn't mean you are weak. It means your body wants the energy carbs provide. Sorry but I don't see any food group as the devil. Just keep going on your plan and the hunger rage will die down as your carb stores refill. Yes you will go up in weight at first - a little but then you will start losing again.

Anonymous said...

Do you ever think maybe we are all overthinking this and totally obsessing about it all? People stayed slim for many generations and yet now nobody can make a move without special diets and dozens of books. What if it really boiled down to exercising every single day and eating much smaller portions of everything? In my lifetime I've bought so many books, read them avidly and then put them aside. Here I am, still overeating ... Maybe it is just a childish I want to eat what I want when I want and you can't stop me!

PaulaM

Lyn said...

PaulaM~

I absolutely think that sometimes. I wonder if we are all overthinking. I mean, every few years it is some "new" way of eating that is "the right way" and it changes constantly. It almost gives me a headache thinking about it. I do tend to overthink.

But then I do not want to overlook something important, either. I am super glad I finally listened to research about sugar and cut it out, because my pain level is so dramatically lower now. So I do wonder if cutting out this or that item might also give me health benefits.

Theresa said...

Oh my goodness. I thought you wrote "a dog is meat, right?" :O then I re-read HOT dog. Yikes. Anyhow...... Great post, and I can certainly relate to some of those convincing reasons to eat what I want!

Lyn said...

Theresa~

LOL! You thought I went off my rocker huh?? I can imagine the comments... "nooo, please don't eat the puppy!"

Anonymous said...

I think the closest thing to a medical consensus on healthy eating is the Mediterranean diet. One review on the diet and inflammation:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21139128

PS, be cautious when it comes to reading popular diet books. The authors always, ALWAYS, cherry-pick the research (Gary Taubes is particularly guilty of this). They're job is selling books, not promoting health.

Anonymous said...

All the information on how to eat makes me crazy, too. I just want to eat and not have to think about every little thing. But unfortunately, due to all the changes that have taken place in how our food supply is processed and marketed, food isn't simple and healthy the way it was in the days of our parents and grandparents. Now it takes work to figure out how to minimize the damage to our bodies that all this chemical interference does. I am only part way through reading Wheat Belly, but it turns out that even wheat is not the same wheat we used to eat growing up - it has been modified to an extreme degree. We have so much choice today, but so many of the choices aren't good for us. The more I learn, the more frustrated I get!

Lori

Anonymous said...

I wholeheartedly agree with the statement above that you need to find out what is healthy for YOU, and one great way to do that is by doing an elimination diet. I also recommend the Whole 30. It's only 30 days, total detox of inflammatory/common allergens, and then you re-introduce food in a calculated way. Some people find dairy is fine, others find it's not, some are fine with legumes, others are not. Many discover they feel much better without wheat, etc. The point is that it's only for 30 days, and after that you customize it based on what your body tells you by the way you react to the foods as they are re-introduced.

You gave Medifast two years. Give this 30 days. It's all laid out on their website, it's backed with research, and there is an insanely supportive group on Facebook. They are Whole 9, the program is Whole 30. Good luck!

Diandra said...

Only you can find out whether any of those food regimens may be beneficial for you - try and see what happens. I strongly suggest that, per se, grains are not unhealthy - they have been a main source of energy for humans for several hundred (thousand?) years. However, of course every metabolism is unique, and there may be people who benefit from cutting out grains (or at least some kinds of grains). If you try it and find it helps you feel good, go for it.

Anonymous said...

A half cup plain yogurt and a couple of tablespoons oat bran mixed with hot water have gotten me through some tough times. good luck.
mary

Jes said...

Mark Sisson and others take the position that legumes are not great for us - they need to be soaked to even be ingested and cause irritation in the gut (leading to the infamous "bean" problems most people have).

That being said, neither Mark Sisson nor most others in the Ancestral Health "movement" are into extremist thinking. Mark Sisson is an 80/20 guy and would probably tell you that if you love beans and oatmeal, to have them sometimes, but no to rely on them as a staple.

As another posted wrote, you will have to see what works for you. But in general, the position of Sisson and others is that beans are not actually meant to be food.

Vegetables, on the other hand, are the cornerstone of these eating plans. GL!