Saturday, November 5, 2011

I Hate Diets (and "Lifestyle Changes")

I hate being on a diet. I mostly hate *starting* a diet, no matter how many starts I have. And you can preach until the cows come home about "lifestyle change"; I hate that too. Really. Now, don't get me wrong. I don't hate the changes once they are made, usually. Once I get into the habit of eating more veggies, drinking more water, exercising, etc, it does get easier and I even sort of enjoy it. But let's be real here. I actually would prefer to continue on with eating what I want, when I want to. I think I will always prefer a plate of gooey, cheesy lasagna with crispy buttery garlic bread over a salad with grilled chicken or even a cauliflower pizza. I hear people say that once they changed their lifestyle, they began to prefer fresh fruit over a candy bar. That ain't me. Oh, I do love fresh fruit. I really do. But I mean, I was raised eating chocolate ice cream for breakfast. I grew up eating candy and cookies and potato chips. And that's the stuff I prefer, all other things being equal. So I hate being on a diet, or making a "lifestyle change," because there is no way I can do that and keep eating bags of chips and cookies. And no, baked kale or flax zucchini cookies are NOT the same, and putting 2 Oreos or 15 chips on a plate and savoring them is NOT the same. Frankly, a lot of the time I *miss* the old ways of just grabbing whatever sounds yummy and eating however much I feel like eating. It's habit, nothing more.

That is what makes this whole thing difficult. The inner brat just wants her yummies. And I have to tell her no. I have to be the grown-up here and tell her those things are not healthy, physically or emotionally. I have to make changes for my HEALTH. Because while I miss the junk food and fast food and all-American apple pies, I *do not miss* the consequences of eating that way. I do not miss being morbidly obese, tired, unhealthy, unable to do the things I want to do. I do not miss the feeling of being unable to control myself around food or the stuffing of my emotions. I do not miss living in a sugar fog.

So it's a trade off. What do I want more? I want this life, a better life, and the price for having it is changing my eating behaviors. It is a day to day thing. I want a sub and chips and Coke because it would taste good, but I have a bowl of vegetable beef soup and green tea instead because it is better for my body. I want a whole bag of those darned mini Snickers bars, but instead I have a Medifast brownie because it will keep my blood sugar stable. I want to sit around eating nachos today, but instead I get outside, rake leaves, walk in the sun, and enjoy a healthy stir fry for dinner. And you know what? It is not such a drudgery. It is kind of enjoyable. Even the food. I like life like this. It is better than being stuck in the house eating cookie dough and feeling like crap. That cookie dough is just not worth the price. Not anymore.

So as much as I hate changing my ways and doing things differently than I have done them for 40 years, I am doing it anyway. It is not easy. Changing long-standing habits never is. "Change" is not a one-shot thing that you just DO and it is over; it takes time and effort. And it is OKAY to acknowledge a taste preference for junk. It is OKAY to say, "you know, I really wish I could just eat a whole pizza today." And then you can choose not to. It is not wrong to feel those feelings and work through them. People always want to believe that we make this grand lifestyle change and all the old ways just fall away never to be seen again, and the thought of a greasy burger or a candy bar is just repulsive to our new healthy selves. Hey, maybe it is that way for you! If so, that is great! But it is not that way for everybody. That is one big reason why losing weight and keeping it off is so hard. That is why I have gone off plan so many times in the past. I still like junk food. I want it. but overall, as a whole, I choose something better. I can never go back to the oblivion I was living in before, at 278 pounds. I might go back to eating lasagna or cookies or even ice cream sometimes, when I am struggling, but I have made a conscious choice that *that* is no longer my LIFE. THIS is. And the nice thing is, once you get going on your chosen healthier path, it *does* get easier to say no to the old ways. It does lead to a happier, richer life. And it is very much worth the effort.

42 comments:

Tony said...

Honestly, I think all the people who say they have changed and prefer eating cabbage over a slice of the best pumpkin pie ever are spewing a bunch of BS. lol. Healthy Eating Nazis are so annoying.

Blubeari said...

This is so true. I'm sure that some people really do honestly prefer the healthy stuff once they change. But for me, I'm simply fooling myself if I say that I don't want all of the foods that hurt my body so much. Yeah it sucks. I'm doing it anyway. Kinda like a lot of things in life. :-)

Karen said...

Making the change to healthier eating will change things for your younger children who may model your choices. So many positive reasons to step out of the circle of food addiction permanently. So worth it!

Norma said...

Sorry, Tony; tastes do change if you are eating clean consistently. Walking by the pastry case at the bakery does nothing for me now. I ordered iced coffee with skim milk only last week and was given one that had at least two sugars in it...one sip made me gag. I used to eat a big 8 oz. block of cheddar cheese every two days as a "snack"...now I haven't eaten cheese in at least two years. I don't crave any of the foods that I used to binge on. Lyn, the quickest road to failure is giving up what you want for what you want right now. For as much as I say to live in the moment and just focus on what you can do at this point in time to reach your goals, when those thoughts beckon, think long term and stay the course!

Norma said...

Some info on why we crave things ...I found it very accurate: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2011/10/25/the-psychology-behind-your-food-cravings_n_1028335.html#s428325&title=Chocolate_

And, why sugar is just as addictive as cocaine: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2011/11/03/fatty-and-sugary-food-as-addictive-as-cocaine-and-nicotine_n_1073513.html?ref=mostpopular

K. said...

This post describes how I feel to the "T." I certainly wish I could eat whatever I want whenever I want and not see the numbers on the scale go up or worry about health risks. It's amazing that in other areas of our lives - work, school, etc, it's much easier to deal with the fact that we must stick to our guns in order to succeed.

Leslie said...

Your inner brat and mine better never meet, because they could do some damage together! I loved when you said about how some people lose the taste for the sweets and other yummy stuff when they eat clean, and you noted, "that ain't me!" Nope - me neither. And at the very core of my soul, I don't want to stop liking that stuff. Hmmm, could that be a large part of my problem?

LHA said...

I have always actually felt that there was a real psychological effect that I craved, and overeating fulfilled whatever it was. I used food like a tranquilizer. Sometimes I needed it so badly that I didn't even care what the result was going to be as far as weight gain went. It is hard to find substitutes that actually provide the same sense of calmness without some bad effect.

So, you are right Lyn. I would actually LOVE to dig into a pan of lasagna, topped off with brownies and ice cream, and I doubt if that will ever change!

Thanks, Norma, for the Huff-Post links. I will read them with interest.

Anonymous said...

I've been a big "healthy eating" person for many years, it is part of my identity. I really DO like many, many healthier foods, but guess what, I really like ALL foods lol. If I could have it my way, I'd eat tons of healthier foods mixed with unhealthy and just go to town. Unfortunately, that can't be my reality if I want to stay thin and have an ounce of self confidence...but my inner brat tends to long for lot of different cheeses, breads, potato salad, pierogies, all my perfect comfort foods. And I tell it that I really can't eat those things very often and have squash and tofu. Heh. It has always been hard for me because I appreciate all sorts of foods, from all different cultures, and really am not very picky. So I enjoy my indulgences every so often with really tasty Indian food complete with all the naan, etc. it is hard though, can't lie. I was raised as more of a healthy eater too with little to no junk in the house... So I think I gravitate to more savory/filling foods hence bread and cheese love. But you can bet I never buy bread or cheese haha. It's about learning what you have control over and not to a point. And these things can change. I can now be ok with a big box of sf fudgesicles and eat them in a normal way, but with,say, shredded cheese and tortillas I am way too tempted.

Anonymous said...

from my last post with *not to a point*, i have no idea where the not came from, haha, i believe i meant "to a point."

anyways-i do have to agree to an extent that tastes DO change over time, and sometimes it switches back/forth/back/forth. In times where I am/was in an unfortunate place of binge/starve or binge/purge, sometimes the sight of tiny little frosted cupcakes, etc, can leave me feeling almost nauseous with need i NEED those. and i'm not even a HUGE sweets person. like i said before, i'm not really picky , but generally i go for more salty or savory than sweet.

but

when i'm in my normal state of mind, which is fortunately most of the time, i can look at pretty much all the sweets in the bakery section of the grocery store (maybe some people think this is weird, but as a person with a history of disordered eating and such, i'm really into LOOKING at food. idk) and i can acknowledge that they look GOOD. like YUMMY YUMMY GOOD. & i wonder about what it would be like to be a person that could just buy the food, eat it normally, let the little box actually last for a whole week or so. lol. i wonder lots of things.

and then i think it must be nice, but everyone has hangups and issues in life, and this really isn't so bad. i'd rather not buy sweets and deal with the mental issues, it's really not that bad of a compromise.

i used to be a totally black/white person with dieting, which probably led me to being obsessive and eating disordered, and i've been trying over the years to change that. i've had my ups and downs, but basically i've found the NEVER approach doesn't work for me....but also the MODERATION approach doesn't work. so where does that really leave me? Mostly for a few days a month, i can eat where i want, and i ideally like to keep that number to 3 days...which is undeniably difficult. sometimes that number goes up but honestly around 3 seems the best way to go. and on holidays i do not restrict at all. some months are awesome, some months i struggle and just can't seem to control myself. i look back and what i was doing different/what i was eating...and the puzzle starts to come together.

this is what i've been doing for a while now and it really helps with accountability and such:
i keep a calendar on the fridge every month, we just print it off the computer. i put a big black "x" through days i exercise, and for me the ideal number is 3-4 days. 5 days is awesome but i've found it hard to stick to consistently.

in addition to that, this part is kind of funny, i put a little "frownie" face on days where my eating is not great.

i keep all the months and looking and my successes/failures.

but it's just a thought...and even when it's so freaking annoying and embarrassing to see so many "frownie faces" in a row or whatever i make sure to be honest with myself. maybe it sounds silly to some people, but for me it works. it's also a good reminder that we are stronger than we really think. when everything is going wrong in life, and you feel like there's no way you can accomplish something...YOU CAN. i've seen it in myself, and it's kind of amazing.

best of luck to you :)

Broz said...

Sometimes I think you forget that there's this whole spectrum of food that falls between treats and diet fodder. Yes, the diet sucks now, the food is boring, it's not as tasty as the treats. But eventually you'll have lost the weight and can transition to food that is in between those two extremes. That has to be worth working towards. A tuna sandwich and a glass of milk (no chips, no post lunch candy) will taste soo good after a diet. A bowl of bean soup (which you keep beating yourself up about), will be normal, healthy food to eat on a weekly basis. This is what you're working towards, not the right to eat junk.

Kelly L said...

I am morbidly obese and I can relate to everything you said.. It's seems to me that I start a new diet every week and if I screw up on Monday - I have to wait till the next Monday to start again.. I have to be the grown up too! Maybe this Monday,..
I've Become My Mother
I've Become My Mother facebook

Tony said...

@Norma - Lol, sorry, but feeling "loved and emotionally fulfilled" is not gonna stop me from wanting chocolate. So you are saying to me that if you were put in a room full of croissants, ben and jerry's ice cream, and the best damn fettuccine alfredo, that you would not be tempted; that you would be disgusted by the taste of these decadent treats? I'm sorry, but it just doesn't work that way. The reality is, you have to create situations that are ideal for weight loss, if that is what you want. If you don't want to gain weight, then don't go to an all you can eat buffet and fill your fridge with a fabulous amount of frozen pizzas. I also really hate the whole "eating clean" mentality. It is just a bunch of nonsense.. The only thing that matters for losing weight (weight, not fat) is creating a deficit. Period. You can do that eating oreos all day long if you wanted.

Joyful Noise for a Joyful Life said...

You really should read my friend Jenn's blog, diary of an even fatter girl. I know she gets inspiration from you but I believe you could get inspiration from her as well.

I believe that eating habits are like being an alcoholic. Some people can put the booze behind them and others need to go to AA for the rest of their lives. I am beginning training to be a leader for Celebrate Recovery that deals with all hurts, habits and hangups, not just substance abuse. I know I need this program for eating, codependency as well as the hurts I have suffered in my life.

I love your blog. You inspire me. I just took every size 18 jeans out of my closet. I am chanting your mantra. Stop eating or go naked. I will suck it into 16s or go hungry. The ladies of the old west had a couple dresses that were form fitting and no material to make more. That was a good motivation to put down the food if they started chubbing up.

Joyful

Tazchick said...

Tony,
If the crust isn't a big deal , it's easy to bake pumpkin pudding without the crust (I never liked it anyway)I use Chai tea concentrate to sweeten and spice it up, and even eat it for breakfast ! :D

timothy said...

i actually do prefer a different type of eating than i currently do. atkins is PERFECT for me (tatse wise)and i lost and maintained (80pds) but when i hit 40 my body betrayed me my metabolism changed and it all went to hell...........hence the weight watchers and portion control but i'd still prefer a slab of bacon and a burger! lolol it's achoice and i'm happy to do it because the body feels better even if the mind/stomach connection aint happy! you're doin great hon just stick to your guns! xoxoxoxoxoxo

Kyle Gershman said...

I find that without something to focus on, I don't. So perhaps dieting has to be a lifestyle for me...I'm okay with it. If I have to have some form of OCD (which who knows if I do or not), it might as well be having to diet for my lifestyle.

Anonymous said...

I want to chime in as a "tastes really do change" advocate. I still have my favorite junk, but sorry, Tony but no pumpkin pie would make the list. Pie = biggest waste of calories, ever. And the first 5 servings of junk still taste great, but what is noticeable is that at that point I crave a salad with chicken. Research has shown that we have malleable fat-o-stats, that you can be used to a 10% fat diet or a 50% fat diet - which may be why fettucine alfredo sounds gross and I can actually eat a serving (1/2 cup) of premium ice cream. Tony, you know the saying, whether you think you can or you think you can't, you're right. Junk Food Nazis are equally annoying.

Anonymous said...

I hope this doesn't make me a jerk, but I'm signed up to run a half-marathon in two weeks and a full marathon in 4 months. Which means that once a week after my long run, I really can eat an entire pizza if I want. It's a weird feeling, to eat before i run and during the run and drink more calories after - and still feel like I "should" eat more to replenish my glycogen stores. I recommend this exercise to all chronic dieters - spend a month trying to put on muscle by doing an hour of weight training and by eating lots of "clean" foods. It's quite the head trip. I'm still losing weight with all this eating, and get annoyed by the lower weigh-in because t means I didn't refill the glycogen enough.

Princess Dieter said...

Tony's view is a tad simplistic. YES, you'd lose weight if you ate 800 calories of Oreos, chipsd, pies, soda pop, and fettucinne alfredo. You'd also develop a lot of issues, nutritionally. But besides that, you'd develop what several studies on rats (and observation in humans)--a whack hormonal system. Clean eating encourages the body to heal. Junk food encourages the body to create issues in the liver, pancreas, hypothalamus, etc.

This is why a lot of folks find that when they start eating real food, clean food, cravings start to subside and weight starts to come off without the insanity that junk food can create. Real whole food has innumerable benefits by virtue of its microutrients, fiber, etc.

So, yeah, caloric deficit will lead to weight loss, even with junk food or overprocessed food, but it may well make it impossible to KEEP off, since nutritional eating has not been learned and hormonal healing has not been achieved.

The point to lose is to keep it off, not lose it and regain, lose it and regain, lose it and regain.

It's to heal, not just get thin.

It's not Naziism. It's common sense. Junk in, junk out. Junk food is like drugs. Real food is like medicine.

Norma said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

not to get all analytical, but i cringe when you talk about your "inner brat". you have a voice in your head that tells you you want junk, which is one thing, but that you give it a personality and call it a brat is another. it seems like the little girl inside who wants junk is you. it also seems like all she really wants is to not feel lonely or unloved. so why is she (you) a brat? i feel like this attitude helps lead to your demise in weight loss. you have built the family you didn't have growing up-- i really hope you can find peace and love in them instead of constantly looking to obtain the love and company of your parents in food. then, maybe you can embrace your inner little girl, introduce her to the life you have now, she won't feel so lonely, and you won't have to hate on her.

Norma said...

Sorry, again, Tony; *I* didn't say anything about feeling loved and fulfilled; you must be referring to someone else's comment. However, if *you* want to "love and fulfill" your body by throwing down x calories' worth of Twinkies and soda and fried cheesy corn dogs on a stick/day (or whatever "America's best junk food" is) and expending x+100 calories/day ("creating a deficit")and think you will be doing your body some kind of favor, go'head and do it. I don't *need* to count calories because I "love and fulfill" my body by eating clean foods that nourish it for cell regeneration, energy, muscle building and disease prevention. If you think science and my personal experience are "a bunch of BS," so be it. You go enjoy your junk foods; I'll keep enjoying my 70-lb smaller self and my health.

Tony said...

@Princess Dieter - Wow, the amount of misinformation out there is clearly disturbing. I have never once in my life heard of clean eating contributing to "hormonal healing". I would love to know where you read this. Hormonal regulation is achieved by getting enough fat in your diet. I never said that eating only junk to lose weight was "healthy" or the most logical way to lose weight, but people who get into the "eating clean only" mentality don't realize that it's not a realistic way to live, nor an enjoyable one. I personally live by the rule that as long as you are getting enough of the proper nutrients, the rest doesn't really matter that much. IIFYM (If if it fits in your macros) - you can google this term. I've lost A LOT OF WEIGHT while enjoying dove chocolate, a late night post-bar drunken meal at denny's, a pint of ben and jerry's here and there, and a lot more junky goodness. Life doesn't have to be an all or nothing road of shittiness.

Tony said...

@Norma - I'm not saying you should lose weight by only eating junk food and creating a deficit. I was just making a point that when it comes to losing weight, a deficit is all that matters (not taking into account what you are losing and body composition). I am saying that you don't have to lose weight by only eating "clean". You can still enjoy the foods that you want. And the emotional fulfillment comment came from that fabulous and absolutely ridiculous article you referred me to on the huffington post. Oh, and lastly, if you want to compare weight loss figures, I have lost almost 140 pounds by giving in to the devil's twinkies.

Dinnerland said...

I agree. It's hard, but it is worth it.

Anonymous said...

Tony, I think some of us are having issues with your popping in and acting high and mighty on someone else's blog. Lyn has stated many times that she gets the concept, but she has BED and cannot/ does not trust herself to eat a reasonable serving of junk. I also have no clue what you're referring to about hormonal regulation and fat; what I've read and experienced is that leptin is regulated by regular carbohydrate reloads; minimum fat are easy to get in modern life, though EFAs need some active monitoring.

Tony said...

@anonymous, I'm not trying to act all high and mighty, just do not like it when people spout information that is inaccurate without any evidence to back it up. And I have been reading lyn's blog since 2008 so I'm well aware of what she goes through. I recommend reading lyle mcdonald's articles on fats to get a better understanding of hormonal regulation and how fats play a role.

Lyn said...

This is a very interesting discussion going on here! I have enjoyed reading it. It reminded me about that guy who was in the news because he lost 27 pounds eating Twinkies. Here is a little article written from a doctor's point of view of those results:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-katz-md/chewing-on-the-twinkie-di_b_782678.html

I tend to agree that one CAN lose weight eating just about anything if there is a calorie deficit, at least short term, but for me I notice my body "tightens up" over time and I have to keep cutting and cutting calories and getting hungrier. Also the Twinkie diet guy obviously did not have the kind of binge issues I have. There is no way I could restrict myself to 1500 or 1700 cal of Little Debbie cakes. They drive me to insanity! I end up eating the whole box.

I would like to try clean eating again. When I tried it before, I kept giving in to my strong cravings for "unclean" stuff. I do get Clean Eating magazine and hope to implement it into my meal plans later. I think it is a good choice for long term health.

And Tony, it is so good to hear from you again :)

Norma said...

The only evidence I need is that when I ate waffles, mac & cheese, pizza and ice cream regularly, I weighed over 200 lbs, had high blood pressure and couldn't carry a basket of laundry up a flight of stairs without breathing hard. Now I eat eggs, fish, vegetables and fruit, weigh < 140, BP is 106/68 and give nutrition and exercise advice to professional athletes. Consciously choosing to put disrespect your body by putting junk food in it on a regular basis is nothing to be proud of.

Lyn said...

Norma~

Junk doesn't work for me either... I am going to have to find what DOES work long term to get off this roller coaster ride!

Diandra said...

Do you really like all the food you used to like the same way? I thought I remembered some posts by you concerning the fact that some stuff is not as good as you remembered it... never as good as the fantasy.

And as for the "BS" about changing your taste... I had a busy weekend. And when finally everything was done and over, I grabbed a bag of crisps because that is what I used to do when I was done with stuff. And Half of that is still lying on the table and I don't intend to eat it, because it really does not taste that good, and it does not make me feel good, and I'd much rather eat a few grapes and an apple instead. I am sure it is not like this for all of us, but I can definitely assure you that it is not complete "BS" either. (i.a. @Tony)

Lyn said...

Diandra~

no, it is not exactly the same. Some things do taste icky to me that I used to like. After being away from them for awhile, some foods taste too salty or too sweet, but I also discovered that my old tastes return very quickly within a few days of eating higher salt/suagr foods. And I know part of it is mental. Part of me WANTS to like those foods and identifies with them in some way. Part of me really scoffs at having an apple instead of a candy bar. Maybe if I gave it enough time (months of clean eating) my tastes really would change for good. I don't know.

Tony said...

@Norma I never knew that eating a donut would be "disrespecting" my body. Look, the point is there are many ways to go about losing weight and I'm glad that you have found that eating "clean" and eating "clean" ONLY is something that works for you. But to say that it is the only way to live is fundamentally flawed, because there are many different ways to go about losing weight as long as you are able to create a deficit. How "healthy" your method is depends on a number of factors, but ultimately it comes down to what is sustainable for you in the long run and what will make you happy. Cuz isn't this journey all about being a happier person? God, I've got way too much time on my hands these days...gotta find a job ASAP.

Anonymous said...

The less "junk" I eat, the less I crave it over time. That doesn't mean I find the junk food disgusting or anything, but it does lose its appeal quite a bit. I really think people with past/current binge eating issues are different than others when it comes to all this, too. Some people can keep a bag of smAll chocolates around and have just 1 a day. A person with binging issues...I doubt it. So you gotta find some sort of medium. For me, it's my own variation of off days or cheat days, but you have to be mega disciplined to get right back on plan the next day, and know that the "off" days will be a rare thing...not a majority thing. It isn't always easy, but helps me feel less deprived than in the past when I would never eat off plan...and then totally go insane maybe a year

Kelliann said...

This is a great post. I often feel so guilty about wanting those things my "inner brat" demands, and perhaps I spend way too much time feeling guilty. Yes, MOST of the time I choose to not give in to the brat, and sometimes I do. But feeling guilty about these things doesn't help. Thank for this post

Beth Ann said...

OMG...I feel like you took the words right out of my brain.

justjuliebean said...

Tastes do change. I used to love Reeses Cups, last time I tried one, it was disgustingly sweet. While I don't think it's realistic to expect yourself to begin to prefer watermelon over chocolate cake, it's possible to look at the cake (or cookies, chips, etc.) as an occasional treat. I still eat lasagna, chips, cookies, everything I used to, just not often, and not a lot of it. Willpower is not a big part of this, it's more a consistent series of little psychological nudges. I don't know how else to put it. If it's Halloween, and we have mini-cupcakes at work, and I eat one and it tastes so good that I eat another, maybe I'll just have one more and call it dinner. Because I don't beat myself up over it, I just call it dinner, be done with it. I haven't given it the emotional charge, which means I don't punish myself for it, and even stranger, I think I'm still over-sugared a week later, slightly repulsed by all of the candy around the office, which I'm not eating at all. Still put it in my coffee, realize it's in my salad dressing, any and every sauce I make or buy, but I'll never be on a crusade against sugar, just sometimes sick of it. I haven't binged in years. I don't have forbidden foods. I have lost 60 pounds, kept off 50, still losing at a snails pace, but it's good enough. I don't struggle anymore, not suffering. It's possible, but it's psychological, it doesn't start with food, though comes around eventually. I wish you luck, I've watched you struggle with this for years. While you seem to have learned a lot, you still rebel,or indulge your inner brat, as you refer to this.

One of the biggest surprises of recent years is that even thin, non-ED people use restraint wrt eating. They don't eat whatever, whenever they want, because they are mindful of their health, whether they gain weight or not.

Anonymous said...

Justjulie-in the given situation, would you really just have 3 mini cupcakes for the day and that would be your dinner, period? Also your lunch, maybe? Depends when you ate them. I've done things Like this on really hard days, but I definitely feel like crap in the end.

justjuliebean said...

No, they were at a work party. Had breakfast, had lunch, then 3 MINI-cupcakes. Which may be almost a whole cupcake. I don't get hungry when I eat too much, and if I don't get hungry, I don't eat. Sometimes I'll have a salad or an ear of corn, because it's comfy to eat something, but certainly not a meal. I feel fine, but recognize that it's not something that I should do often. I used to have blood sugar instability, but no longer, whether due to my exercise or regular eating, I'm not sure.

Neva4getme said...

You know what I took from this post? A lesson for raising my kids. You reminded me to stay focused on making sure my kids eat well balanced healthy meals - so it becomes THEIR norm. It is hard to shed those old habits we learned as kids *hUgS*

Lori Watts said...

Thank you for this!! What I hate is that my eating habits are already very healthy, but if I eat enough to satisfy my appetite, I gain weight. Maintaining my weight in the healthy BMI range means walking around hungry. That just doesn't seem fair.