Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Question

What would you say if I told you I was considering gastric bypass surgery?

122 comments:

Naomi.de.Plume said...

Go for it. Seriously, you work hard at this, you've tried. You're not one of those people who will eat everything the days before to 'make up' for what they can't eat later. At this point, you're carrying around your past in the form of fat on your body. It's not what you eat today, or last week, or even last year but fat from years and years ago. Let it go. If you can afford the surgery and it's medically indicated, why wouldn't you do it?

Anonymous said...

A blog you might want to read about it: http://healthywriter.blogspot.com/2010/02/what-if-your-digestive-system-is-broken.html

Shanel said...

I would say.. if anyone should do it ... it should be you... you've tried to lose weight on your own and if you can afford it... and qualify for it... do what makes you happy... you only live once...

Weighting Around said...

I would say go ahead, as long as you've done your research, talked with your doctor as well as your family. If this is what you want then go for it!

Enz said...

I would say it's huge decision. Do your research. Talk to patients, successful and not- talk to doctors and your family. At the end of the day, you have to do what is right for you and only you know what that is. Hugs.

Neesha said...

I would say make sure you have the support you need to go through recovery and to make sure you have plans in place to maintain your loss. With Carnie Wilson in the news so much right now, it's a sad reminder of how gastric bypass can be a poor solution if you've not got your insides figured out. I personally know two people who have had gastric bypass, lost over 100 lbs. and are now doing great. They exercise regularly, eat well, and live pretty normal lives. They both say that at their heavy weights, they just couldn't DO what they needed to do to be healthy. Hard to walk, hard to move, etc. I've never been that heavy that I physically couldn't do the exercise so I can't really comment on that. I do know that after losing 40 lbs., my body moves much better and does things I couldn't do 40 lbs. heavier. So I assume if you lose 100+ lbs, the effect is just that much greater.

In the end, I would say that if this is truly what your heart is leading you to, then I don't pass judgment.

Drina said...

It's one tool. It works for a good number of people for whom other strategies have failed, but it's not a foolproof cure. Some people gain the weight back after the surgery as there are ways around the eating restriction. The rate of mortality from the procedure alone is relatively high, so there'es danger involved, but it has also saved many more lives than it has ended.

A personal choice. That's all I can say.

notjustcelery said...

Honesly...I would say it wouldn't solve your problems. Just like it wouldn't solve mine and that's why I never considered it, even at 251 lbs.

We KNOW what to do. We KNOW how to do it. Our problem is that sometimes we let our emotions get the best of us so we do what we've always done which is eat.

My problem with gastric bypass is that while you physically can't eat that much food, it won't curb your urges to do so and in the long run it won't fix how/why you turn to food when emotional.

Does that make sense?

You could probably point to some bloggers who have had success with it, but you could also turn to a lot that have done it the old fashioned way, like Tony (The Anti-Jared), Jen (A Priorfatgirl), Tony (Panda Bites), Jack Sh*t (Jack Sh*t Getting Fit), Mizfit (Mizfit), myself (Not Just Celery), I could go on and on and on....

Megan S said...

It's hard, my first inclination is: are you even big enough> My second thought that I was actually thinking about you the other day is that you're really good at maintenence. You are, you've been eating approx the same number of calories you've been burning for quite some time, so that makes me think you wouldn't have the problem of gaining back. It is a lot to put your body through though so I'd do a lot of research and a lot of soul searching. Good luck!

Kathleen said...

I'd like to see you try what I've been doing before doing anything that drastic. I know everyone says that, but just from what you write, I think it could work for you -- and then you wouldn't have to do surgery. It's a complete sugar/flour elimination (there's more to it, of course). You eat so healthy now, but your calories are so low and you still have the cravings. It gets so frustrating when that happens.

katie ann said...

You seem to be self-aware enough that I think you'll be able to handle the self-discipline it requires. Here's a very good blog post on someone's experience with it:
http://loraleeslooneytunes.com/2009/03/25/gastric-bypass-surgery-my-story/

Kate said...

Take a look at a lap band, it's something that can more easily be reversed than standard gastric bypass if it's not working for you.

midlife_swimmer said...

I would say I have known four women who died from gastric and complications even up to three years after the surgery. And that honestly our bodies are not meant to have less intestine. I think even obese if people eat fairly well and exercise 5 hours a week they are healthier than those close to normal weights who have had gastric bypass. If I had a friend considering this I would suggest the lap band if I know they had exhausted all other avenues.

Debu-chan said...

I'd say that adding another scar, physical or emotional, in this battle against fat is a bad idea. And it's not going to do anything to solve the underlying problems that caused the weight gain in the first place. Recent seasons of Biggest Loser have had some bypass failures on, who regained everything they'd lost with the surgery and had to go back and do it the 'right' way with diet and exercise anyway.

Having a stomach the size of a tablespoon is not going to change the fact that you want to eat the world when things are upsetting or stressful or nerve-wracking or whatever. It will, however, make you even MORE miserable after you succumb and eat the cookies/pastries/chips/whatevers. And, hey, it might even kill you. :(

Laurie (GastricGirl.com) said...

I am two years out from gastric bypass surgery and have successfully lost over 160 pounds. I've had several complications, but in the end, I would choose to have the surgery again.
The most important thing is to research, feel at ease with your decision, and know what changes you will have to make in your life. It is definitely not a cure all - it's a tool.
If you have any questions, you can email me, or visit my blog. http://gastric-girl.blogspot.com or Laurie9797@gmail.com

Anonymous said...

Please think long and hard about it Lyn. I had it done in February 2004. Everything went well. I did what the doctor told me to do and lost 80 pounds. I have since gained 50 back. Its very easy to do.... afterall, the surgery is done on your stomach, not your brain. It is an excellent resource for those who have medical problems due to obesity and I would never discourage someone from getting it! Just keep in mind that you can out-eat the surgery in time.

You are a very special person and I have enjoyed reading your blog for a long time now.

I would say that if you do decide to have the surgery, you really need to look into asking your surgeon about counseling as you go. I wish I would have!

Tammy said...

I would say that I've met a couple of bloggers that have told me they learned how to eat around the band, and they gained their weight back.

I would also say that the problem is not with your stomach, it's with your brain....and they don't make a lapband for the brain.

I would finish by saying that you're not alone in considering it. I did. I most certainly did...and I researched it a great deal. And when it came down to it, I knew deep down that the problem was/is with my brain.

Banded Girl said...

I've been reading for a while but have yet to comment here. Thanks for your blog, I appreciate your honesty and your insights. They help me figure myself out :)

Now, weight loss surgery. The first thing I would tell you is to do your research. There are a lot of different types of surgery out there today--it's not restricted to the gastric bypass like it was not too many years ago. Additionally, I've heard of some pretty horrible after-effects from the RNY procedure (seizures, vitamin deficiencies, undiagnosable mystery conditions).

I had an adjustable gastric band (the LAP-BAND AP) placed almost eight months ago. I don't regret my decision at all, but I do wish that I'd heard more about the vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) and duodenal switch (DS) procedures before I made my decision. I'm not certain, but I may have picked one of those operations instead of the band.

Ultimately, each surgery has its own awesomeness and pitfalls. It's really a matter of choosing which procedure matches you the best. It's not an easy way out, no matter what many people think and say.

Kyle Gershman said...

I think my answer would be different if you said that you decided to have it. Sure...consider it...but I'd have serious reservations for doing it.

I'm assuming that you will have been evaluated for all other conditions that could physiologically prevent successful weight loss before reaching any decisions on a surgical solution.

theantijared said...

Hmmmmmmm.....

Megan said...

I would say "yes". You've been trying for so long. I think you have a healthy mindset and have what it takes emotionally to make the surgery be a great tool.

Anonymous said...

I would say you're just having a bad day. You know that you are what is standing in the way of your weight loss. There's so much work to do to figure out why we are our own roadblocks. My weight struggle is similar to yours. I've been in counseling for about 6 months now. Take a look into a book about self esteem. My counselor keeps telling me "it's not willpower, it's willingness". There's my 2 cents!

redballoon said...

Very disappointing. Waste of time and money and everything you've learned, but have yet to consistently do long enough to see the results you want.

Mommy P said...

I would say that honestly it is your choice. Only you can make this decision and if it is the correct one for you then great. Either way there will be people to support you through your blog.

Wendy said...

I would say to think long and hard about surgically altering your body. Do lots of research, talk to your doctor, and get a second or even third opinion.

Even at 301lbs, I didn't consider it. I was not willing to live with the permanent changes that surgery would bring. It took me about 14 months to lose the 156lbs. I would rather have spent that rather small amount of my life losing than the rest of it on the restrictions that surgery would bring. Granted, I have daily maintenance now, but IMO it is easier than the maintenance I would have had with surgery.

I DON'T think surgery is the easy way out, by any means. Ultimately it is your decision and you have to decide what is best for you. But please research it throughly before making any decisions. Surgery may physically prevent you from overeating, but it doesn't fix the emotional reasons for overeating. I know two people who have had the surgery, and they both replaced their food addictions with other equally as damaging addictions.

Theresa said...

http://www.weightymatters.ca/2010/01/can-15-minute-outpatient-procedure-cure.html

This certainly caught my eye. Since you are asking for advice I will say it has been something I have considered more than once. Not a quick fix, but a tool to help. In the end if I had to choose I would begin with the above option..... once it is approved for use that is.
hugs to you.
feeling like this is normal buddy.
we care.
you're worth the fight.
<3

Greta from www.bigbottomblogger.blogspot.com said...

Your choice, clearly..but like many others said it is NOT a permanent solution. Only lifestyle modification is a permanent solution. If you have tried to create a 7000 calorie deficit each week through diet and exercise and are not losing 2 pounds a week....then maybe something is broken and needs to be addressed. If it were me....I'd up my amino acids to support healthy brain function (and suppress cravings and emotional eating incidents), ramp up the exercise in whatever way possible....spend money on a gym membership instead of on a surgery.... Also, visit a naturopath to see if you are even absorbing the food you eat. (I had an absorption issue that was blocking my body from using nutrients properly...mine stemmed from gluten..but there are other absorption issues, too.)

If you feel that..truly...eating well and exercising and addressoing underlying issues such as nutrient absorpsion does not result in weight loss....then go to plan B. But...being chopped open and having a body part modified is pretty extreme.

spunkysuzi said...

I would say you have to do whatever works for you. And i would totally support you.

lindalou said...

I would say NO...you can't take any chances with your health by electing to have surgery. Your kids esp your baby NEEDS you. You are not THAT heavy!!!
I'm the same weight as you....we can do this the old fashioned way!!
Never know if you're going to be the one with a leak and infections and so on and so on....Risky.

Greta from www.bigbottomblogger.blogspot.com said...

I also strongly recommend checking out a book called "The Diet Cure" by Julia Ross from the library and giving that a read!!!!

Leslie said...

The surgery won't remove food addiction, the sugar addiction or the cravings and urges to eat for emotional reasons. There are people who are so tremendously obese that it is almost a medical necessity. I don't see you as being there. You can lose weight when you follow your plan, Lyn.

I personally think it would be a fantastic idea for you to check out either Overeaters Anon. or Food Addicts in Recovery as part of the research process. Maybe try one of the programs for a month and see how it goes.

That said, I've come to love you and care about you over a year of reading your blog, and will fully support whatever decision you make, as long as you're not looking for a quick fix which of course Gastric Bypass is not. And I know you aren't looking for a quick fix. It's not the easier softer way at all.

Many people have done beautifully with bypass and been able to maintain their loss for the duration. I work with a woman who gained all her weight back after bypass. Part of your most valuable research is your own journey and how it's been for you. You certainly have been at this for a long time. Hugs and prayers as you continue to investigate.

Pink Panda said...

I honestly don't think it's a good idea because if you can't lose the weight right now, imagine how hard it will be once you are at a lower right to keep it off. Your BMR will be less and you will have to eat at a much lower calorie allotment.

Lyn, I've been reading your blog for almost two years now. I think you have the knowledge to do this. Don't give up. Surgery is not the way out.

Tony

Sarah said...

I have a friend who did it and I would never do it. She is sick all the time and throwing up what she does manage to eat. She talks about all the foods she will never be able to eat bc of the surgery.It just doesn't seem like it is worth it. Her 2 aunts did it and have gained the weight back. She looked into lap band and decided this was what was best. I personally will take counting points over the pain she has gone through. Everyone is different though. I would just hate to see you go through the surgery and it back fires or something.

Val said...

Delurking to recommend a thumbs-down to surgery...I have known several clients & a couple of family members who suffered horrendous complications - my cousin never recovered & died about 2 wks post-op.
I was puzzling over the most diplomatic response to your heartfelt rant: obviously different people have to devise different solutions, but starch & sugar obviously trigger your cravings. (I know it does the same for me.)
A wealth of good info here:
http://fathead-movie.com/

Genie @ Diet of 51 said...

Carnie Wilson published a diary about her gastric bypass surgery. You might read that.

Jack Sh*t, Gettin' Fit said...

Well, I'm thinking about getting bicep implants. I want guns like Tony's!

katt said...

I say it is a question only you can answer. There are people for it, people against it and and people who are on the fence about it. But it comes down to you.

ctina said...

I say don't do it. It is a major procedure, and no guarantee the weight will not come back.

It IS possible to lose the weight without going to such extremes.

Jodee said...

I have been lurking your site for a few weeks now, but had to give a comment to your question. It seems like everyone just sees the glimmer of what the surgery can do to a person's image. But they don't always think about how the surgery will effect the rest of their lives. I have never had gastric bypass, but the things they say happen after the surgery if you eat the wrong foods, sounds like what happens to me with my IBS. It isn't fun to go out to eat, and worry that I may soil myself if I can't find a restroom ASAP, if I eat the wrong foods. I just feel that you have done so well without the surgery. You have dropped a lot of weight on your own. Please don't get the surgery, I think you will hate yourself for doing it years down the road.

Anonymous said...

I don't think you should do it. You know how to lose the weight; you just have to stick with it and do it.

Who is going to take care of you and your children when you recover from the surgery? Remember, if you want to remove the excess skin, that's another series of surgeries and recoveries.

As suggested, I think you would benefit more from counseling. You need to find out WHY you're not losing the weight. I don't think WLS is going to solve the problem on the inside.

Seren_Sighs said...

I'd be really surprised honestly.

You've proven you can lose weight. That's not really the issue. I think the issue is psychological. You come back to this weight often. When things go well for a while you just seem to randomly go back into old habits.

You're so much healthier than you used to be. You know how to eat really healthy, not just less. You just have a food addiction. But gastric bypass won't fix that. I kinda view it as surgical anorexia honestly. You're basically forcing your body to only be able to consume a few ounces of food at a time. If someone who didn't have gastric bypass only consumed a few ounces of food at once we would them considered anorexic. The only difference is that they don't fit our perceptions of anorexia.

I don't think it's for you. You have a young daughter that you need to be there for and I don't think you should risk your life with surgery. And you can show her how to be naturally healthy even if it's at a higher weight than other people.

Also, I've watched a lot of those gastric surgery shows and one said that the surgery is just a tool, but 75% percent of success is working the program. And many people gain some weight back and stretch out their stomachs. One of the popular Biggest Loser contestants on season 7 had gastric bypass and still ended up over 400 pounds.

I don't think it's all it's cracked up to be.

Anonymous said...

There's still no magic bullet. Your personal insights are amazing ... and yet you seem to miss that you are not eating enough. There are so many low-calorie foods to eat and they rarely make your lists. No wonder you crave other foods, your body craves more food and you try to hold off because your very idea of food is chocolate cake not Swiss chard. Surgery won't fix that. Love you anyway Lyn ... PS I vote for eating South Beach and counting calories, simultaneously. Eat more, girl, but the right stuff.

Camevil said...

It won't fix what's broken.

Melissa said...

I would not think anything bad, if that's what you're asking. I wouldn't think less of you.

I think it's necessary for some people. Others don't know HOW HARD this is - the incredible struggle. I am not doing the surgery, because i'm scared to do it! HAHA. I'm a wimp. SO i told myself that i will only consider it if i get to 300 pounds. Because 300 is a VERY SCARY number for me. I was at 279 when i decided that. I had just gained 20 pounds in the first 8 months of my marriage so it wasn't out of the question, gaining that much more. That's when i changed my habits. I've only lost 13 pounds, but it's working.

You are someone i've learned a lot from & you have worked SO HARD. i think if you've done your research & want to do it, you should go for it. I'd totally understand & support you.

People are right - it won't fix what's broken. But that is w/ the misconception that just b/c you get the surgery you aren't changing your mindset. You've been changing your mindset & lifestyle for years now. I think if anyone did it that "should", it'd be you. :)

Friend of the Bear said...

Hi Lyn. I would definitely have it myself if I could. There's no question.

Yes you would still need to be careful with eating for the rest of your life. Of course.

It would force a change in your eating and you wouldn't find yourself able to eat things without even realising it (as you've posted recently). It would reinforce all the changes you want to make but can't do consistently at the moment.

I think it would assist you in reaching your goals. Definitely worth looking into.

Bearfriend xx

Anonymous said...

Make sure you do all your research and think about it very carefully. The surgery is a tool, not a cure all. You have proved with all your hard work that you don't *need* it, but another tool in your arsenal would probably help you.

That said, make sure you do not go out of the country for surgery due to cheaper costs. I had a Lapband implanted in Mexico by a reputable doctor there, and while I haven't had any problems and love my band, there is no support system, no education, no counseling, and no one to turn to with questions. Get your surgery done in the U.S., it's worth the extra money.

Paula Rodriguez said...

GO FOR IT!!!

Andra said...

Have you watched Carnie Wilson's new show? She hasn't addressed her "Daddy issues" and has gained a lot of her weight back. It's just a temporary fix to lose a lot of weight fast. But it won't stay off if you don't do the emotional work and the behavior modification.

hillarythomsen said...

PLEASE consider the vertical sleeve or lapband first. *ALL* weight loss surgery still requires very hard work to lose and keep off the way, but it is a great tool. Gastric Bypass isn't the golden standard anymore, but yes - you would be an excellent candidate for weight loss surgery! VERY EXCITING. (I've lost 120 lbs with a lapband and love your blog...struggle with the same food issues as you...SERIOUSLY.)

Rina said...

Oh, if I could tell you how my heart leaped for joy when I read that :) You have tried SO hard and you're already eating really well! If those pounds could magically disappear, you would be eating in a very healthy way to maintain that weight. The problem with these surgeries is that people's habits haven't changed, and they can gain all the weight back and sabotage their health. But you've proven that you can be healthy. I think it's a great idea! I would be so happy for you.

Anonymous said...

On the one hand.... I say go for it. I know along with you that continuing to do the same thing and not seeing different results, is insanity. On the other, we don't know the long term results of the surgery and I know that you tend to "binge" where my issue isn't a lot of binging, but just being unable to lose. I do fear that you might be one of the ones that gets around the surgery via eating in small binges. Also the life situation may not change... and that may not be good.

Do you have coverage for it?
Noreen

Dinah Soar said...

Honest answer? I'd say forget it. I think you are looking for a way out right now. Gastric bypass surgery is permanent and there are no guarantees. If your're set on surgery as a tool, I'd check into the band thing.

I've been reading your blog for a few years now..and you are an honest person and you share your bad eating days....They come quite often. I'm not condemning you, I've done the same myself. The truth we we all must face is this: one 'bad' day can wreak havoc on a string of good days...it can undo everything.

When I gained 20 pounds in ten weeks I couldn't believe it..that's two pounds a week I reasoned. How does anyone overeat that much..there must be something wrong with me? But then I did the math.

To gain two pounds in a week I'd need to eat 7000 calories above my caloric needs to maintain, i.e. an extra 1000 calories per day.

Overeat 1000 calories a day?...impossible I said. Sounds like a lot doesn't it?..until you break it down to meals.

Meal wise that is only an extra 333 calories per meal. It is very easy to eat an extra 333 calories per meal.

An extra pat of butter , an extra tablespoon of mayo , chips as a side instead of carrot sticks--these are 100-120 calorie 'mistakes'.

It could be as easy as eating a cheeseburger instead of a grilled chicken sandwich, some french fries instead of a salad, and a candy bar to appease the sweet tooth instead of a piece of fruit.

So often, if we really examine the facts, we find they aren't what we believed them to be. That's my dilemma..and the dilemma of so many who struggle with weight loss, or any kind of addiction. Our choices always come home to roost. If we want to find our way out, we must work through the problem until we solve it. If we don't we will spin our wheels, sit in the same spot, stuck, never making any progress forward.

Margie M. said...

I know my opinion is just a little different than some posted...but I don't consider anything in you "broken". You are just trapped in cycles of binge eating, eating properly, being desirous of eating healthy, binge eating, eating properly, being desirous of athing healthy....and over and over again. It is what a lot of us have done, or are still doing. I'm not sure that surgery will "cure" that behavior pattern. Sometimes, however, it is what is necessary for a person to improve their eating habits enough to stick to it when you have healed and lost the weight you need to lose. Other people, return to old eating habits and begin to "eat around the bypass" as someone else posted and their weight slowly returns.

Some people, no matter WHAT they try, just cannot do it alone and the surgery is a possible lifeline for them. It is a huge step and one you should not take lightly. Investigate everything you possibly can in relation to the operation and the surgeon who would perform the surgery. What kind of after care will you get? Emotional and physical?

My SIL had the surgery in 2004 and has been very happy with the results. She has kept her weight off. She did require 2 cosmetic surgeries after the bypass due to excess skin. That is another ramification you need to think about as you lose a lot of weight quickly.

But on a moral note....nothing wrong with it. Personal choice and it is all yours and your family's to make.

Good luck with whatever you do.

Margie M. writes at:
www.myhealthylivingthruweightcontrol.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

Go for it if that is what you really, really want.


I had gastric bypass surgery and lost 100 lbs. Hit me if you want to talk.

b_r_arizona@cox.net

Autumnforest said...

My father died obese of heart disease at 59. My sister had the same issues. She tried everything but had no ability to get it right on dieting and exercise. She feared for her life in her late 40s and got gastric bypass. Her recovery was horrendous and agonizing. She was in and out of the hospital a lot for being unable to eat at all. What she could eat afterwards was very limited. She eventually was able to eat certain weird foods and lost 150 pounds and got slender for the first time in her life. Well, sounds like a good story, but it's not. Because she no longer had her food addiction to feel better, she started to drink. Her liver got affected. Then, she got a tummy tuck for the extra skin and nearly died from that. But, she survived. Ultimately, she died at 50 of adhesions in her abdomen from the surgeries, when the intestines sort of meld together from the scar tissue and your bowels can't empty and they explode inside your body and you die the most horrendous death of peritonitis. Her death was agonizing as her body shut down. I know it doesn't happen to everyone, but once you get a surgery of the abdomen like that and ultimately the skin removal that must occur, you will definitely have adhesions, the question is--how bad? It's a very tough and tricky thing. You will never eat sugar again--it's not usually tolerated. Do you know yourself well enough to know you won't drink, spend money or smoke cigarettes or do pain pills to deal with addiction issues? I know it sounds cruel, but the question is--do you want to fight your mind like the Biggest Loser people and lose it the real way or do you want to fight your body and force it to do things it shouldn't do? You have to take supplements the rest of your life, often feel weak, lose hair, get adhesions, and look very gaunt from losing weight too quickly. We see it in others who do the surgery--their faces look hangdog. Then, they gain it back eventually--look at the chick from The View and the chick from the Wilson Sisters? Hmm... Just really think about it--do you put your life in danger so you don't have to do the mental work or do you buck it up and do the mental work and earn the weight loss and the health--the health is the key here--healthy body-healthy mind-healthy eating. This was a tough love talk, but I want you to really think about it hard.

Jennifer said...

I had WLS in July of 2003 and would do it again in a heartbeat. I did have pretty significant regain due to 2 pregnancies and nursing for years but have taken off 75 pounds in the last year.

Obesityhelp.com is my favorite weight loss surgery website.

Anonymous said...

I would say DO NOT DO IT.... I know 2 ladies who passed from it . I also know of two that gained most back. Plus look at Carnie Wilson. You will gain it back if you do not get the emotional eating part under control. Why risk leaving the planet and your beloved family. Mel

Ashley said...

I'm surprised you haven't considered it before now. It seems like you'd be an excellent candidate to have great success with it!

Blossom said...

I would say I have seriously considered it as well. I honestly don't think there's anything wrong with it, that it's cheating or whatever. My only concern (for myself, and you may have some of the same issues or not) is, will my HEAD accept it? I have a lot of eating issues in head that I don't think would be fixed by the surgery. But it would certainly help.

Shelley said...

You still have to eat right after the surgery, and as long as you're having binges, I wouldn't do it. Too many people have gained after having surgery for it to be the answer to your problems. And there could be complications - what about your children? I know it's your life, but I have to say that. Don't give up yet, my friend.

Hallie said...

I would say... take the money you would have spent on permanently destroying your guts, and put that money to hiring a personal dietician or nutritionist. Meet with this professional once or twice per week, be honest with him or her. I feel like gastric bypass is drastic enough to be reserved for only the most painfully and morbidly obese.

rachel said...

Thats a hard one Lyn.. I feel like you were on such a stride for a while with your mood and such, that winter may be getting to you more. Have you ever tried anything like OA? I know people that do very well with the 'just for today' method. All that said, I have been and may well be again, where you are. I know how hard it is and how hopeless and exhauting it can become. I wouldn't think less of you. I think you can do it without the surgery though... I really do!

Holistic Health Coach-Tri Mom said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Holistic Health Coach-Tri Mom said...

DON'T DO IT!!!!!!

You will be eating from a straw or like it for the rest of your life. You can do this without it.

I know Im on a diet that many people criticize if they havent tried it...but its been working for me and a ton of others. Check out my blog for details...and I can send you links to all the yahoo groups with answers. Really, its easy. Very strict diet for 43 days, you balance your hormones...Ill give you all the details if you are interested. ITs a short term committment for a long term payoff...and if you dont like it or it doesnt work for you, then you can try gastric bypass or the lapband. Please think about it though, the 5 yr mortality rate of someone undergoing that procedure is high compared to everything else you could do. Your kids need you...

Holistic Health Coach-Tri Mom said...

And I will offer you free health coaching for three months if that will sway you to not do it...

Anonymous said...

Gastric bypass is a temprary solution to a permanent problem. EVERYONE I know that has had it gains back a good deal of their weight. Then you are left losing the weight the same way you are trying to lose now. You could die from the surgery...your kids would have no Mom. They love you the way you are. go here to learn more http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=massagegoddess#p/u/0/oVLq0NzRNi4
Amelia almost died from complications....a year later.

clickmom said...

I'd think long and hard before going under the knife. It doesn't solve the problems, only disguises them for a while. I considered it (and also the lap band) for about a day and half until I did the research. It's too risky. Surgery risks are plentiful. But the deal breaker for me was being aware of how many people regain the weight they lose immediately the after surgery? That was all I had to hear. Also, the alarming number of people who turn to alcohol after gastric bypass? Shocking. I'm going to keep plugging at it the old fashioned diet and exercise way until I get where I want to be. You have to do the work with the surgery for long term results, so the danger didn't seem worth it.

Wendy E said...

I would say to think long and hard about it, do your research, talk to those who have done it, both successfully and unsuccessfully. I know of three people who have done it in the last few years. They all look great, although I think in at least one case she has lost too much weight. I know I thought that of another one of them also, but she has since filled back out a bit and looks fabulous now. I have thought of it in the past, but as my husband refuses to even let me consider it, it is kind of a mute point.

Taryl said...

I would worry, Lyn! That's the honest truth.

Gastic bypass can be a wonderful tool, but NOT for an emotional overeater. At 270 pounds, weight was your biggest health problem - at 230, you quality of life is much better, and there isn't as much physical urgency to drop the poundage. Given that your weight loss problems are NOT physical, why would a physically altering answer be your solution? I am not trying to be harsh, but you have brilliantly proved, time and again, your ability to shed weight and be satisfied while doing so.

Your head and heart are your roadblocks, and your recent blogs affirm this more and more. A physical surgery won't give you permanent food control if your head is still full of the demons that caused you to gain to begin with.

There is also the consideration of how this would impact your health. Your immune system is based largely in your intestines, and you would turn a healthy body into what amounts to a sick (albeit skinnier) body for the rest of your life. Permanent supplement regimens, malnutrition, deficiencies, secondary complications of the glandular systems, elimination systems, muscular structures... Such a surgery can shorten your life far more than the possible side effects of being obese, depending on your individual risk factors.

My own research on the subject led me to realize that gastric bypass would work for me if I wanted it, because I don't struggle with binge eating or emotional eating beyond the occasional boredom snacking. But even as a pretty good candidate, I still declined a surgical solution when I realized how damaging it would be to my health. I could have very realistically gone from a healthy fat person to a sick thin person, and it wasn't worth it *to me*.

I would say that if you could deal with your binge issues more fully (and you have already come so far!) and devote yourself to a year of healthy living before surgery, you would probably find by the time the surgery rolled around that you wouldn't even need it anymore, because you'd weigh too little. And if you couldn't stick to that eating plan for that year, how would you stick to it with the surgery, when it hasn't really ever been physical hunger that has caused the most impactful binges you've had?

Gosh, I hope I am saying what I mean and not coming across as judgmental or harsh. You are one of my most personally important bloggers, and your struggles have helped me so much through the years. I don't think you shouldn't have the surgery for ANY reason other than that I am afraid it will ultimately worsen your health and not fix the underlying issues that started your backslide in the 2-teens and have plagued you for the past two years :(

If, in therapy, you could work through the rest of your food walls to where you'd be reasonably certain that your occasional social eating would be the worst stretching damage you'd do to your pouch I'd give my total (unimportant!) blessing; but given the health damaging potential and the reality that it won't solve the bigger elephant in the room than your weight, I think it just opens the door to a lot of heartache and exacerbated health.

When it gets down to it, this is between you and your doctor. Do research and decide for yourself, but there's so many ways that a gastric surgery can fail to solve food issues, and it creates more problems than it solves many times, with permanently handicapping your amazing body's ability to deal with physical stress and handle nutrients.

I'm thinking of you and hopin you find an answer that satisfies you in this area.

ClistyB said...

I think that if a doctor deems you in that category, then go for it. You are the type of person that could maintain the loss. Ive seen so many cases of gals getting the surgery, but totally sabotaging their diet and not losing as much or even gaining! You are of a completely different ilk than they are though, you have a better handle on things.
No matter what, make the choice for you BY you.
This gal has chronicled her experience here.. http://lifewithlindalou.blogspot.com/ She is a grandmother and was recently laid off of a job with StampinUp, so the posts aren't all lap band. Best results I've seen.

Steelers6 said...

I would say, "are you really"? Or are you just wishing to hear my reaction? And I would also say, "tell me more".

I read every single post here, and this is a very interesting discussion you have going here!

My thoughts/suggestion--PRETEND you have had the lapband or whatever surgery.

Really.

I know the patients have support in counselors and also personal trainers. So get that. If you want, and under a nutritionist's care, you could do the meal {protein} shake that they have to drink for about 1 month after I think. THAT would make anyone lose weight! Then progress to very small, frequent, bland meals. (I have not had the surgery, know someone who did, but I might have some of the details wrong.) Oh and work out with a personal trainer (I hear the workouts are brutal!) and take lots of walks. (which you already do of course.) I think I would really shape up and lose weight if I had to go to the gym and do what the trainer says. Then you are on to very nutritious small frequent meals all through the day I believe. I think patients take their own food w/them every day, so they can be sure to get what they need, when they need it. I think you are already doing this too. I guess you need to pretend/focus on how ill your stomach would feel if you eat something outside the plan during your trial run.

Good luck with your pretend post surgery experiment. I know a lot of the pretend stuff I mentioned is already very much a part of your life, so you would maybe only need to implement a few more?

Best to you friend! Chrissy

Jer said...

I would tell you that while people who lose weight on their own have been proven to keep it off longer, losing the weight is all that matters as long as you develop the right habits to keep it off. Continue exercising and eating the right foods, continue lifestyle changes and you'll be fine. It's important to get the weight off and if you feel that gastric bypass is the only way that you can do it, as long as you incorporate the lifestyle changes into the surgery I see no reason not to. This isn't about being hot and skinny- it's about being healthy.

The Countess of Nassau County said...

Not an easy route by any stretch. Slow but steady will be ultimately be a more satifying, and certainly a safer way to reach your goal.

Cari said...

I would say go for it! There is no shame. Although it is nice to hear what others think, ultimately you should do what you think is best for you. I am usually just a lurker but I really enjoy reading your heartfelt honest blog posts. You are a great writer!

All the best!

Michelle said...

Not a poster, but felt I needed to "weigh in" on this topic I know so much about. I could never in good conscious tell you yes or no, but I can tell you from personal (I had gastric bypass myself 10 years ago) that it only works if you have conquered your other food "issues". You WILL loose a bunch of weight - so much, that I personally considered it "worth while", however, with that said - unless you have a realistic and completely honest judge of your own eating patterns - you WILL regain.
I lost 130 pounds after surgery...I was not prepared. Hear me, I WAS NOT READY toose the weight. I hope you are..

Best of luck to you

Anonymous said...

It's not going to solve your emotional issues, which is what is at the root of your weight problem. Don't mean to be harsh, but surgery wouldn't be the RIGHT answer. If yo think it wold solve that, yo wold be SO BADLY mistaken and I wouldn't expect that from yo; I think yo are wiser than that. Also, yo wouldn't be able to enjoy food. Overall, it wold be A FOOLISH DECISION.

I respect you Lyn, so that's why I'm giving you my honest answer. Please don't do it because you are desperate.

Anonymous said...

What kind of advice is, "It's up to you?" Thank God these people don't have advice to give out. Also, gastric bypass surgery is more to improve your physical appearance in my opinion b/c it's ONLY about losing weight/looking much slimmer, it doesn't heal you from your emotional wounds. Again, I feel that people w/ food issues, including myself, physical appearance should be the LEAST of our worries, and the emotional healing part the first.

Sorry I'm talking like you're actually thinking of doing it when i don't even know.

Once Upon A Dieter said...

I would say that I totally understand the frustration that leads one to ponder this. I pondered it. Occasionally, I reponder. I always backtrack from it for one simple reason: I would be mighty pissed off at the universe if I was a regainer like Carnie or like others I've read about online. Some bloggers who were in "I'm losing" heaven two years ago are now in the "shit, why is the weight coming back and what am I gonna do" hell. Not all, but enought that I can't justify rearranging my innards and riskign complications or death.

I'd say think it through and read all the cautionary tales, not just the happy stories from those who are relatively new to it.

My advice would be no only cause 1. you don't seem to have multple comorbidities that I understand would be good jusstification (heart disease, diabetes, etc) and 2. you have young kids to raise and they need you, and if you have complications of a serious sort, where does that leave them? If you die, a very slight possibility, but a possibility, where does that leave them?

If you do it, I think all of us who ahve come to care for you would have your back, just as we wish others well, like fabulous Kate. But since one will still ahve to modify one's eating and lifestyle and exercise ANYWAY or face regain, it's not the ultimate fix. Nothing is for obesity. It's just a series of fighting and finding way to keep fighting and dealing with issues.

I hope you think long and hard...and whatever you do , I will wish you very well indeed.

Anonymous said...

I agree with what some others have said. You are still in the process of learning about your behaviors, but recognizing isn't conquering. You've come so far in recognizing the problems, but you haven't spent nearly enough time conquering these issues. I know it's hard...it is...I'm way bigger than you. I've lost weight many times and now I'm doing it again, but what's different this time is that I not only have the knowledge of my behaviors, I also have the tools to learn how to beat them. Gastric is just an out...a really risky, painful out at that. YOU have the tools to succeed at this...but you've got to stay in for the long haul. Surgery is not going to make bingeing go away. I've considered surgery before, but b/c of my food issues, I knew it would end up being a waste of money. Time and time again experts have said that good old fashioned weight loss is the way to go. Also, you aren't extremely big...to take such a big risk when you are able to exercise and you have access to healthy food, would be bad. You've got kids...these surgeries are no joke. At 230lbs., you are living a lot of life...it could be taken away in a blink of an eye from complications. Also, I really think you need to look into the hormonal aspect of things too...see if you have PCOS, or insulin resistance. A lot of bingeing behavior for me was in fact hormone issues...that I take medicine for now. There is a lot of science behind eating behaviors...do research and go to a doctor. Good luck with whatever you decide, but honestly, you've come so far...I think you are strong enough to get through this. You're just gonna have to put the extra "umph!" behind it. :)

happyfunpants said...

I read this earlier today and couldn't quite figure out why you're asking the question.

It's not like you...or at least not like what I've grown to read about you. I could see you saying "I'm considering gastric bypass surgery. What do you think?" but to ask what we would say IF you were thinking of that procedure? Something seems fishy.

It might be that you're asking for advice for a loved one...I don't know. It's just that the way you posed the question isn't direct and it isn't forthright. And you've (to my recollection) always been both.

What I will say is (if you're asking for you) is that it is my belief that you will feel that whatever decision you've made is best when the decision comes from YOU. You might already know what that decision is (and maybe you just don't want to admit it to your readers)...or maybe you're trying to figure it out.

In the end, I believe that there would be times when you'll be happy that you made the decision you did just like there will be times when you had made the opposite decision - no matter which way you choose.

Because of that, whatever your decision (again, if this is for you), I believe that you will have more peace about it if you make the decision for yourself.

I've read each comment on here. You're smart. You know where to find the research. You're introspective enough to be able to tune into why you're wondering about it now.

So what gives?

Ruby Leigh said...

I would say you are too thin

Mrs. L said...

I would say wait. Wait at least a year or two. Let the surgeons keep perfecting their techniques while you keep working on your health. No one knows yet what the life expectancy of WLS patients is. So give it some more time.

You are not in imminent danger. You are able to exercise and enjoy life. Why take a chance with losing that right now?

Diana said...

Lyn, I love you. It's your decision, and although I don't know you personally, I feel like I know you.

If you're really thinking about it, be sure to investigate it thoroughly. You have a beautiful little daughter that needs you. That's all I'm saying.

I read the anonymous comment and read that blog post. I don't agree with it. You definitely do not have a broken digestive s ystem. Personally, I think that's a bunch of BS. You can and have successfully lost weight, and you will continue to do so.

However, like I said, it's your life, your decision. Just make sure it's the right thing for you. :)

Rachel said...

Is there anything you can do medically/surgically to help your arthritis or knee issues first? Not necessarily instead of gastric bypass... but I wonder if you've explored that?

Beastie Girl said...

DON'T DO IT! I don't know one single person who's had it done who does not regret it on some level.

Badger said...

Do it! I think you work hard at this. x

CJ said...

At the end of the day the decision is totally yours, but just think how hard it is on your body. You have lost amazing lot of weight and that is the best way to lose and keep it that way. Please dont play with your body. It is best to do it the natural way. Even if it feels hard and slow.

screwdestiny said...

I would say that's weak. I would say that if there was nothing outside of your control that aided you in gaining the weight (such as steroids) then you shouldn't need anything to artificially help you take it off. And the stomach isn't meant to only hold, like, 3 oz. of food. By the way, I know it's not a picnic. I know it's "hard" to recover from it and whatnot. But it's harder to simply make good choices, yet, if you lose weight the right way not only will you feel better about yourself because you know that it's you that did it, not your stomach forcing you to control your portions, but you will have also enforced the habits that will make sure you don't gain it back.

emmabovary said...

I sense you truly want your readers' input on this, so I'll throw in mine.

I agree with the other comments here which address the emotional issues you've shared with us through this blog. I think that any WLS for you would be a rather bottomm-down way of getting to why you overeat. In that respect, it have a chance of succeeding on the physical aspects of your issues. My thinking then is yes, if you just wanted to rid yourself of the physical aspects of your issues, WLS, taking into account the risks, of course, seems like an answer.

But what one would be left with is all the led to the overweight. From what people are saying here, *that* won't be cut out when they perform the WLS. And that is the root of why one overeats...to buffer the pain of an unsatisfying relationship, a painful past, a feeling of solitude and lack of connection to the love that is outside of yourself.

If you are really asking this question and open to your readers' opinions? Mine would be to "right yourself" emotionally. That means feeling worthy enough to leave your partner who is, from what you share with us, not honoring your human need to blossom into the person you know yourself to be. Love enough enough to recognize that you and your children are better off without this emotional abuse hovering over your lives. You will then be free to shed your buffer and this in turn will attract the right partner for you...the one who will make you the Lyn you know yourself to be...the one who already knows what choices make her feel good and healthy and the one who, when freed of this emotional and physical weight, will feel that finally she's in the right place.

Mary said...

I would advise you to go back and read your blog for the last 4 or 5 months. If that doesn't motivate you, maybe gastric bypass is what you need. Only you can make that decision.

Meghan said...

You would lose weight with gastric bypass. Then in two years, you will be asking yourself the exact same questions you're asking now: why did I eat that? Did I just eat that? What is my freaking problem?

Trust me. Gastric bypass does not fix that. You'll have the exact same problems, it'll just be harder to eat some of the healthier foods you like.

Sorry, it's the truth.

Derek said...

I've considered gastric bypass surgery, too, when I was feeling like there were just no other options. It can get really discouraging when nothing seems to work.

I usually talk myself out of it for a couple reasons. I don't like hospitals and surgeries, and I am afraid of the possible side effects.

I know one woman who did have it done, and she seems to be doing just fine with it. She eats next to nothing, and she has to be careful about overdoing it, but she has lost weight, and she's happy.

I personally would like to think I still have the power and self-control to bring myself to a healthy weight, so I don't have to worry about all of the "what ifs" of gastric bypass surgery.

Alas, it is your personal decision, and I am sure you will do what's best for you.

carla said...

Id say I never ever ever judge another person and for sure a smart compassionate wise woman such as you.

Change for Good said...

Lyn,

I have not taken the time to read all your comments to this question, so I hope this isn't a repeat. I would suggest that you consider ALL the weight loss surgeries out there. I had the duodenal switch WLS, and know it was the best decision for me. I would be more than willing to talk with you about it via the phone if you would like.
Tiffany

ryry the adventurous said...

I have had one friend who has had it and been very successful. If you think you want it, go for it!! I am sure you have done your research. I think you know the risks. If it seems like a good path for you, you know we will be here to support you!

Anonymous said...

I would say do lap band first - easy and not so invasive.

Jill said...

Lyn,

I would not encourage you to have the surgery. You have young children, some of whom seem to have health issues of their own, and they need you to be around, alive, and capable of caring for them.

If you have the surgery, you will have a long recovery period even if there are no complications. If there are complications, the recovery will take longer (maybe forever), or they might lose you entirely.

My aunt had gastric bypass surgery, twice. Both times with horrible recovery, constantly throwing up, and she lost some weight, and then gained back even more. But she waited until her daughter was in college and capable of taking care of herself, and she also had a very supportive husband and lots of family in the area.

One final recommendation that I have for you - I've actually thought of this before but never posted - I think you would benefit HUGELY from taking a self-defense course or martial arts of some sort, or even kick boxing at the local YMCA. Even if you can only do some of the moves, it'd be a good outlet for your frustration, and it also would provide you with the tools to feel safe at a lower weight. You speak often about being afraid to be small, as though someone could hurt you. As long as you feel that way, the surgery isn't going to help, and you'll find ways to eat to "protect" yourself. Self defense or martial arts - an ongoing class - could really alleviate this one road block that you have.

If you think you are too big, you are not. Check out "DietGirl"'s blog. I don't know her personally; I've just read her blog. She started doing kick-boxing when she was bigger than you, and moved up many "belts" over the course of a few years. It's also great fitness. Even if your knees can't handle the kicking, etc., yet, your arms can handle the punching.

I know this is a bit off topic, but I hope that it helps! You seem very concerned about your daughter's well-being (not wanting her to be embarassed about you, etc.); please make sure that you're around for her!!

Lea said...

I agree with NotJustCelery...it will change the physical symptoms but won't begin to address the emotional reasons for eating in excess.

Jennifer said...

I have been wondering how to suggest it to you. I have felt so bad for you watching you go through all the same struggles I did, over and over. I had my bypass just over 2 years ago. It was the very best decision I have ever made for myself. Granted, I was much bigger than you are at the time.

Yes, you still have to make healthy choices, and know how to eat right and everything the people advising against are saying. They are absolutely right. But you have a built in restriction point. And it's a lot easier, once you've lost the weight, to monitor and catch it when you've gone up 5-10 pounds, make adjustments and fix the problem than it is when you need to lose 100 or more.

I will say this though - the vitamin and protein regimen is NOT NEGOTIABLE. If you don't think you can follow it for the rest of your life, faithfully, don't do it. And do your research on that - some surgeons still advocate flinstones vites and tums, which we know is wrong. You will need a lot of supplementation - multivitamins, calcium citrate, fish/flaxseed oils, vitamins b,d,c, and b12... and like I said, this is for life. As well as eating a high protein diet.

Anyway, I will stop taking up space in your comments. If you want to talk more about it, please feel free to email me.

Better Off Alive said...

I have considered it myself. I decided that even with WLS I need to change my lifestyle.

I do not look down on anyone that does...you need to do what you need to do.

Anonymous said...

Would altering your precious, functioning insides which have sustained you despite continuous abuse be wiser--or any easier--than enforcing an absolute ban on problematic foods in the house? You stated recently that you are raising the littlest one differently than you did your older children when it comes to junk food. The older ones ARE old enough to get any junk they want outside the house and the little one isn't going to bring anything into the house. But then there's the husband issue, and something will have to change there...

Since there is a risk of (very!) premature death, surgery should be a last resort. Can you honestly say that you have done EVERYTHING in your power to lose weight in a safer way?

I do admire you: you have worked to change your life and have seen success proportional to your efforts. I admire your continually enforced fast food ban. I admire your bicycling. I know that you can build on these already strong foundations and achieve anything you desire!

Lee said...

My ex-uncle had it. Four months later, he was hospitalized and they removed 4 GALLONS of pus from his insides. He was in the hospital for months.

Major surgery. Unnecessary major surgery. You've proved in the past that you can be successful at weight loss. But now you're in a plateau and a little desperate. Plus if you don't have the support of your family now (with healthy foods), you will not have the support of your family later.

Don't do it.

Shannon said...

I'm 10 years post op from gastric bypass. I lost over 150 lbs initially and have gained back about 45. It has been a constant struggle, but a struggle I knew would be there. I had surgery on my stomach, not my head. The desire to eat has always been there. It will never go away. I have suffered many complications from the surgery and have been in the hospital at least 50 times in the last 10 years. Do I regret my decision? No. I lost the weight.. I experienced things I would have never experienced at 300 pounds. I go on airplanes and amusement park rides, I can play with my son, I can shop at regular stores and wear regular sizes, I have an amazing job, I found the love of my life, I'm more confident. Surgery did that for me. So I gained some weight back. I'm working on that. I've suffered some long-term health issues from surgery. But who knows? I've lived to see another day. Without surgery, I'm not so sure I would even be here. But my life has improved in a major way. Good luck with your decision.

Anonymous said...

I had to go back to the home page and look at your weightloss chart and it's in my opinion that if you found a doctor that would consider doing a GB on someone who weighs 234 you should punch them in the face.

Kristy said...

Don't. I've know three people who have had this surgery and three people who have died from complications from it. Plus I don't believe that you weigh enough to be a real canidate for it.

bbubblyb said...

Lyn, I read your blog all the time. I'm still here reading and will always whatever choice you make. *hug*

Anonymous said...

I just read yesterday that at least 15% of people who undergo the surgery regain all their weight. I know several people who have had it, and they are miserable. They feel sick, they throw up. I honestly don't believe you get all the nutrients you need with a stomach the size of a peanut. Many people also develop other addictions afterwards, Carnie Wilson became an alcoholic for example. I vote a big hell no. You know you can lose the weight, you have done it.

PaulaM

Anonymous said...

Wow you recieved a lot of comments on this question! I say go for it! I have a friend here who had it done two years ago to avoid getting diabetes. If you need someone to talk to you I can put you in contact with her.

Sarah Lownsbery
sarah_lownsbery(at)yahoo(dot)com.

MB said...

I would say you don't have enough weight to lose to be considered for it. I'm seen too many people suffer after surgery, lose a ton of weight and gain it back after a few years. Keep doing what you're are doing. The longer it takes to get off the more likely it is to stay off.

Of course, if you really felt like you had to have it done I would support you 100%.

Anonymous said...

Lyn, I haven't read all the posts (such a huge response!) but so far posters (the ones both for and those with reservations)have been sensible.

I can't add much - only to say I'd never in a million years have thought you'd have even contemplated it. I don't know why, but you are able to understand yourself and analyse things when they go well and when they go wrong. Whatever happens weight-wise and food-wise you eventually become upbeat and positive. I so admire that in you. There has been many a day when your words have given me the strength to go on - or they have been like a much-needed kick up the backside!

However...when the weight doesn't fall off I can imagine anyone overweight might think about it. I have, but just a few horror stories put me off.

Ultimately, it's your choice. Whatever you decide, I wish you well.

DBDee x

Anonymous said...

I haven't read all the comments either, sorry to be lazy, but there are too many.

My question back would be to ask you what you think the surgery will do for you that you can't do without it? Why do you think the surgery would work better? Do you have any evidence that it would be better for you?

I'm not anti-WLS, I had it myself and was one of those that regained most of my weight and have reached a point where I can eat almost as much now as I could before. Then I had to re-lose the weight with regular diet & exercise. I don't regret the surgery, it was a part of the journey, it just wasn't the final answer.

I wish you the best whatever you choose.

riverview said...

Please don't. I would be so afraid for you. The risks outweigh the benefits. I agree with Jill about the martial arts classes.

Also - It's almost spring. (I can't remember where you live, or if you're snowed in like we are in New England.) Soon you will be able to walk more days because it will be warm out. Think of the gardening and yard work. Think of the farmers' markets a few months from now.

I know it's frustrating to be hindered by knee and foot problems when you really want to exercise. You are doing a great job with the bike. I hope you can keep doing that when its not too painful.

Do a little walking when you can.
Consider swimming - not water aerobics if they cause damage (can't remember if that was a problem for you). You can use a kickboard and just kick laps if you want. Breast stroke is great.

There are lots of strength exercises you can do sitting down or laying on the floor. I can share about this if you want to email me.

Try "bibliotherapy" again. I know you've probably read a hundred diet related books. Here are a few I read over and over again when I need to:
*Making the Case for Yourself -A diet Book for Smart Women by Susan Estrich
*Refuse to Regain by Barbara Berkeley
*Fit from Within by Victoria Moran
*The Thin Commandments Diet by Stephen Gullo
*Thin for Life by Anne Fletcher
*The Philoshopher's Diet by Richard Watson (but do not follow his low calorie ideas - its too low)
*Anything by Michael Pollan

I hear your frustration right now. It gets tiring working so long at this. You can do this.

Joanne said...

I know a few people who had it done. One lost a lot of weight and put most of it back on...yes, it's possible. The other one lost a lot...but still has a lot to lose...6 years later. One friend is doing very well, but her hospital roommate who had the procedure done the same day died unexpectedly 18 months later...and I think the surgery was responsible.

It's something to consider...but weigh your options (no pun intended)

beerab said...

Please don't do it :( At least opt for something less drastic like the lap band.

My friend's mother died from it- it was a horrible experience. :( And I have one friend who did it and she gained the weight back over time cuz she never adressed her over-eating issues.

I do think that you have emotional issues (who doesn't?) and some food addictions that need to be addressed. GBP won't fix that. I struggle daily with my issues and overall I'm getting stronger.

I read conquering your food addiction- it helped me a lot- I only paid $3 for it on Amazon. Girl I will send you my copy if you want it!

Anonymous said...

I'd say do a ton of research. I did.

I then chose the Duodenal Switch b/c I wanted to lose the most weight and have the least chance to regain (not that you can't).

I did it almost 5 years ago and while I had a rough first year it has changed my life significantly for the better.

Mary :: A Merry Life said...

I agree with the other comments. Do the research. Check it out. Make the decision yourself. If it is right for you then it's right. Best of luck.

Lisa said...

I would say NO, but I would also say look into the gastric sleeve. That is what I am going to get done and it has WAY less potential complications as the bypass and only a VERY slim chance of regaining weight. I "fought" getting the surgery for YEARS. Truth is, if you are a food addict as I am, you need medical help. Only TWO percent of dieters keep weight off. Someone said don't due it because of your kids and you need to be there for them. Iw ould say that is my reason for DOING it. I have lots of info in the sleeve on my site if you want to check it out... www.inweighovermyhead.blogspot.com

Carly said...

I know that surgery wasn't the right choice for me. If it is for you, we'll support you the entire way.

But, I don't know that it is. I think that you CAN do it, and that maybe it's worth giving it a try without surgical intervention for another year or two just to possibly avoid some of the nasty side effects.

Either way, I'm standing behind you!

phelpsvj said...

shocked.
:-(

Salted with Shadows said...

Lyn, as others have said, I seriously doubt you weigh enough. I am only six months out from my bypass, but am already so glad and grateful that I had it. I researched all options for about ten years before I had WLS and I tried everything else for twenty or more to no avail. If you are seriously considering it, you need to read every story you can--good, bad and otherwise--and go into it with your eyes open knowing that the worst-case scenario could happen.

As others have said--and I know this firsthand myself--your brain is your biggest obstacle. I will be fighting mine for the rest of my life, which I knew going in. WLS is only a tool, not a magic bullet--but you know that already.

Many others here have suggested lap band, but after intending to have that procedure initially, I attended a food addiction support group with several other women who had had it. Not one was able to sustain any kind of weight loss. With lap band, sometimes it's easier to digest a cookie than a vegetable. It is also not as "reversible" as it's touted to be. If you are going to do any WLS, do your homework, obviously, but you will get no judgment from me. I am someone who never thought I would have WLS and fought vehemently against it for years. Only you know what is right for you.

sugarmeg said...

honestly, it would break my heart a little bit because I weigh 225 lbs and i try to be content with that. i used to weigh more but i struggled down to this plateau and i don't have to work hard to maintain this weight.
if you feel that you need weight loss surgery then i guess i do too? it reminds me of one of my best friends in high school who was also thickalicious and overweight like me, until she became anorexic and then every day i saw her wasting away it was like a criticism of my weight (i was in the 160s at the age of 16)

On the other hand, you are your own individual person and you have to learn to be happy with yourself and i think you should do what it takes to feel content with your self.

Lyn said...

sugarmeg~

What any other person does with their weight has no bearing on YOUR weight or what YOU should do! Truly, if I aim for 160 that doesn't mean YOU are not ok just as you are. If YOU are happy at your current weight, be proud!

In fact the #1 reason for me wanting to lose weight is to get rid of the daily pain in my knees. Bone on bone, no fun. The doctor says I will be crippled if I do not lose the weight.

I hope this helps.